Police say motive in Molson Coors mass shooting remains unknown, as 1 year anniversary approaches

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MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) -- Friday marks one year since the mass shooting at Molson Coors in Milwaukee.

Six people lost their lives that day, five victims and the gunman.

Hundreds of pages of police reports still leave one question unanswered, why did it happen?

Witnesses and family interviewed by police don't understand why the gunman killed five of his coworkers that day.

Just after 2 p.m. on Feb. 26, 2020, violence erupted in the Molson Coors Utilities building.

Employees in the break room heard four rapid gunshots.

Police found the bodies of Jesus Valle Jr., Gennady Levshetz, Trevor Wetselaar, Dana Walk and Dale Hudson.

Twenty minutes after the first 911 call, officers found the body of the gunman Anthony Ferrill. He'd shot himself.

Police interviews focused on trying to understand why the shooting happened.

One witness said the gunman had some kind of problem with Valle, but didn't know what.

Another said racist incidents may have played a part.

That witness told police another worker had called the gunman the n-word and used another racist stereotype in the past. The witness also told police the gunman had found a noose in his locker at one point. However, the witness did not believe these incidents motivated the shooting.

The gunman had been involved in a workers compensation case with Miller Coors.

Neighbors told police the shooter believed he was being followed by the company and seemed paranoid.

The only clue as to what would ultimately happen nearly a year ago happened moments before.

A witness said he heard the gunman call to make arrangements to have someone pick up his child from after school care, something he normally did himself.

The gunman's wife told police her husband had collected guns since the late 1990s and had a lockbox in his car to store them when he couldn't carry them.

She also said while the shooter was paranoid about being followed, they never felt the situation was serious enough to call a doctor.

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