Milwaukee County residents face clean-up challenges from tree damage

Tools

by Priscilla Luong

MILWAUKEE-- Vanessa Caban still remembers stepping outside after Monday night's storm.

"The tree just pretty much popped up the cement, who knows what else could have happened," she said.

An uprooted tree hit Caban's car.

"It sounded real loud," Caban recalled, "like people's houses were shaking."

Caban's car-- just one of two, trapped underneath.

"My car is the one that's way in deep there," said Charlotte Skelly, Caban's neighbor.

Skelly remembers when Caban told her what happened.

"I came out and I was shocked, just totally shocked," said Skelly.

One day later-- their neighborhood is still dealing with the storm's aftermath.

"We really lucked out really well with our homes not being affected by it," said Skelly.

The forestry services manager in Milwaukee says they've received at least 500 reports of tree damage. 

"Our emphasis is opening up streets so we're safe for travel," said David Seyver, Forestry Services Manager for the City of MIlwaukee.

Once roads are cleared-- the city will clear out trees from city sidewalks.  Tree damage on private property is the homeowner's responsibility.

Maggie Bringa with State Farm says your insurance agent can help you decide how to move forward, but if you don't have insurance already-- you're out of luck.

"After the fact, it's too late for that instance," said Bringa.

As Caban waits for a damage assessment on her car-- she says despite this eyesore-- she knows things can be much worse.

"I thank the lord that it didn't fall on my house, because we wouldn't have no place to live or nothing," said Caban, "you know, it probably could have taken down a house or something, who knows with how big it is."
 

Poll

Should America lower the legal age to consume alcohol from 21 to 18?

  • Yes
  • No