Justice Beyond Borders

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by Lila Carrera

Undocumented and on the run, a man suspected of murdering his wife flees the country and law enforcement is left without many options

"After he killed my sister, he fled. We don't know exactly where," said Brenda Garcia. 

Jose-Luis Discua-Bados, 31, is from Honduras. He's wanted by U.S. Marshals for  first degree intentional homicide. He's accused of killing his estranged wife 24-year-old Dayana Garcia Bados.
 

Brenda Garcia, Dayana's little sister was at work the morning of January 3rd, 2012 when she got the phone call. "I got a call from my grandma and she said 'He killed her. He killed Dayanita," said Garcia.  That phone call is nothing compared to what she saw when she pulled into Dayana's driveway.
 

"I saw a huge puddle of blood and pieces of a two-by-four broken, at that moment, i just started screaming," said Garcia.


Her sister  had been beaten and stabbed 12 times. Garcia said her family knew the relationship was rocky. 

"In Hispanic culture it's just, when you're married you have to work at it the best way and not get the police involved," said Garcia. It's believed that Bados fled the country.
 

"Once the level of violence gets severe, where now they aggressor is facing serious felony charges, often times they undocumented person will tend to flee," said Cpt. Alfonso Morales with the Milwaukee Police Department. 
 

Dayana's story while tragic, isn't all that uncommon, criminals will often flee to avoid prosecution.
The U.S. Marshals in Milwaukee are looking for hundreds of criminals, at least 38 were born in Mexico and could be there now.

"It's a lot easier for the undocumented to flee the country," said Cpt. Morales.
The process to extradite them is also expensive.
U.S marshals tell us, it can cost taxpayers at least $10,000 to extradite one person from Mexico.
 

"There's culture of,  they rather  go back to their country than be in jail," said Patricia Ruiz-Cantu.
Cantu helped open La Luz Del Mundo in the summer of 2012.
It's a center that provides help for perpetrator and victims of domestic violence in Milwaukee's south side,


"Sometimes some of the victims do tell them(police). They say, the perpetrator told me that he is going to flee to Mexico or El Salvador or another country, and they mention it to the advocate or they mention it in court and nobody puts attention to that. The system was not there to support them," said Cantu.

If there wasn't support before, Cpt. Morales wants to make sure there is now.
'Through our agencies we should be able to identify the problem and get them the help they need," said Morales.


It's help Dayana never got.  "I miss her a lot, just the everyday things, like if I was to have a child or get married, she wouldn't be there," said Garcia.

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