Hottest day of the year brings struggle to stay cool

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by Lane Kimble

CUDAHY -- Inside the air conditioned South Shore YMCA gym, kids worked up a sweat Tuesday.

"We're always ready," Day Camp Director Chris Przedpelski said.  "When it's coming to kids, we gotta be perfect."

The hottest day of the year forced the staff to keep kids off the soccer fields and jungle gyms.   Przedpelski says when the heat index hits 85 degrees, they move inside.

"Counselors make schedules, plan A, plan B, plan C, so they have an outside schedule and an indoor  schedule so they're always prepared," Przedpelski said.

Keeping 180 kids entertained inside can be tricky, but the staff offers games, crafts and other  activities during the 11-hour day.

"We can't control the weather, all we can control is our attitude and if we're positive, the kids  are going to stay positive," Przedpelski said.

Outside a Milwaukee Walmart, Shontel Greskoviak made sure to bring her kids in with her too - something she fears not all parents will do.

"We may get one or two that don't think straight, but we pray that they keep everything safe with  the kids," Greskoviak said.

And it's not just children needing to stay cool.

"For these 48 hours we need to be extra vigilant," Wisconsin Humane Society's Angela Speed said.

Speed warns heat stroke can hit pets in less than ten minutes, causing vomiting, diarrhea and excessive panting.

"Make sure that your animals have a cool, comfortable place to rest, never tie them out in the sun  either and make sure your animals have access to fresh water," Speed said.

If you believe your pet is suffering from heat stroke, contact your vet first and try to cool the animal down bathing them in cool water.  Using ice water can put the animal into shock.

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